Advice to a young agile developer written by an old one

On reading Franklin’s essay Advice to a young tradesman I thought that it had some specifics for agile developers. Of course, it is a total piece of genius that is centuries ahead of its time, and I’m adding nothing to it. Particularly in the writing. Franklin’s prose is clean and humourous with not a word wasted. Even if you disagree with him – and I don’t see how you could – then you have to love the writing. So with apologies (and I’m not really old…):

Time is money

Every hour spent working on something that is not directly related to a feature request is time wasted, and time wasted is money wasted. Every feature that is made that isn’t needed also has a cost in that is measured in features that are needed that don’t get made. And if they do get made, the work is rushed

Quality is money

If work is rushed or for other reasons has low quality then you will spend more time – and therefore more money – on repairing it and making good. Of course, bearing in mind that quality is a feature you should bear in mind point #1 and only deliver what is needed.

Trust is money

When you deliver something and it doesn’t work, your agile methods of rapid development will be doubted. You’ll be forced to spend more time proving that quality is high, and so you’ll have less time to develop new features, and as we know, time is money. If you always deliver features on time and with known quality, then you and your methods will be trusted. Users will engage with the process more, they will be more interested in the systems you produce and will be able to produce more focused requests and more accurate bug reports.

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